So good in every way – #sgiew_SlowLived

So good in every way – #sgiew_SlowLived

This week’s so good in every way challenge {#sgiew} is about rethinking the way we live and act as consumers, and to understand our impact on people and on the planet.

people tree slow living

Every other week on instagram, we have a photographic theme – so on #sgiew-uesday (Tuesday) for this theme we are celebrating a spot of “slow living” – asking you to use the hashtag #sgiew_slowlived as an antithesis to #fastfashion, so who better to be our guest judge than @safia_minney – founder of People Tree and MD of @po_zu ethical shoes.
The prize this week will be one of Safia’s newly released (& signed) books Slave to  Fashion @slavetofash – so get sharing your photos!!

We are slowing things down, and looking for your hashtags #sgiew and #sgiew_SLOWLIVED – Let us see how you slow your life down, take stock, and look at the bigger picture.

(pictured, me, wearing People Tree, with our part-time-pet Pickle – my cousin Angie’s dog who spends some of her time with us as a family here in London, so that we don’t have to get our own dog and therefore adding to the carbon paw print – ps – methane-producing we know, yet we still love her – she gets us out into the countryside, away from screens, and mobile phones – and out into the fresh air…)

Extracts from Safia’s Slave to Fashion book – explaining more about Slow vs Fast Fashion:

“As founder and CEO of People Tree, the Fair Trade company I set up in Japan 25 years ago, I was able to make sure that at least some garment workers in Bangladesh and India could escape the horrors which are widespread in our fast fashion profit-driven clothing industry. I developed the first Fair Trade supply chains and helped to create social and organic standards to improve the lives of over 5,000 economically marginalized people in the developing world. 

Working on this book has given me the chance to take stock of what we have achieved as a Fair Trade and social justice movement, the extent to which we have helped to shape current business practice and thinking, and what more needs to be done to finally end modern slavery. There have been some significant gains recently: Britain’s Modern Slavery Act, which came into force in 2015, and which you can read more about in Chapter 1, was inspired by the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act and by three decades of campaigning for Fair Trade, social justice and ethical consumption… It is much harder now for brand owners and boards of directors to turn a blind eye to the conditions in which their clothes are made….

In China’s context, modern slavery means forced labour…… Factories that are producing garments for fast fashion brands are pushing workers to do 12-hour days, with only one day off a month. In some extreme cases, factory workers were starting at 7.30am, working through to 2 or 3am, getting a couple of hours’ sleep and then starting all over again….”

Further reading:

Slow Fashion – Aesthetics meets Ethics, by Safia Minney

Slave to Fashion – Safia Minney

Melanie BarnesSlow Living Retreat (free e-book) 7 days to slow down and reconnect back to yourself available from Geoffrey and Grace – Melanie Barnes’ wonderful website.

The True Cost Movie

The True Cost Movie

The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film which I would recommend you ALL watch – if you’ve not yet seen it. We watched it with our boys, who were 11 and 13 at the time, perhaps a little young for some of the more disturbing sights, however, our 11 year old said that all schools should show this – as they and their school friends start to ask to wear the latest fashion brands, perhaps it will make them ask ‘Who made my clothes?’

The film that pulls back the curtain on the untold story and asks us to consider, who really pays the price for our clothing?

We are lucky enough to have ‘hand-me-downs’ from local friends with older teenage boys, so we are not directly buying into this culture of fast fashion, however, as the boys get older, they see their friends at school wearing ‘designer’ brands, and have started asking for the same themselves as special birthday gifts.

Some of our favourite thoughtful brands that cater for teenage boys, Lost Shapes – great raglan sleeve screen printed designs, printed in Frome Somerset, using organic cotton, and fairtrade Ts. And Po-Zu.com whose unisex, ethically produced eco sneakers really appeal to both teenage boys and girls.

We do however find it really hard to buy ethically for teenagers – and would welcome suggestions in the comments box below….

Well, what an incredibly diverse week I have had… hanging out at #ZandraRhodes penthouse with Fritha @tigerlillyquinn (thank you @peopletreeuk), look at Zandra Rhodes’ floor!! 💕 THEN watching the #truecostmovie at the #hackneypicturehouse (great food; life-changing film, a complete *must-see* excellent work @safia_minney @lucysiegle) and spending the evening with Jill @themiddlewick… And then today realising you are a mother of an 11yo boy and spending his 🎂 birthday bouncing around on trampolines (what a hoot! Thank you #oxygenfreejumping) where I was the dodgeball champion. I thank you. 👑 Exhausted. Now at home with a Gin and Tonic. As you do. #feelinggrateful #embracehappy #nothingisordinary #nothingisordinary_ #amazingfloorsandwanderingfeet #fblogging #ethicalfashion #floortiles #ethical #sustainablefashion #eco #fashionrevolution #fashionrevolutionday #slowfashion #PoZuShoes #ihavethisthingwithfloors #soveryhappyandglad #fromwhereistand #happyhipsterfeet #london_by_incredibusy #makegreenmainstream #enbroguepleasureandpain #PTxZR ☺ #lfw #ss16

A photo posted by Ali Clifford (@incredibusy) on

Rent or own the film today! Visit http://truecostmovie.com for more details.
Director: Andrew Morgan
Producer: Michael Ross
Sound Mix & Design: Michael Flowe
Composer: Duncan Blickenstaff
Exec. Producers: Livia Firth & Lucy Siegle
Vincent Vittorio & Christopher L. Harvey

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